Coca-Cola and Cancer Risk

Wednesday, 20 Aug 2014 03:46 PM

By Russell Blaylock, M.D.

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Coca-Cola is one of the most consumed soft drinks in the world, especially among the young. Today, it is sold in more than 200 countries.
 
Concern over the heavy consumption of this drink led to a study of the effects of Coca-Cola consumption in Sprague-Dawley rats over a prolonged period. The results were published by the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.
 
What they found was shocking — but not altogether unexpected, as since high consumption of sugar alone is associated with a higher cancer rate in animals.
 
Of the animals consuming Coca-Cola, researchers a significant increase in incidence of breast cancer in females, and, shockingly, in their offspring as well. They also saw a statistically significant increase in noncancerous tumors of the pancreas in both males and females — and their offspring.
 
While not statistically significant, they did find a higher incidence of cancer of the pancreas in the Cola drinkers. The researchers noted that cancer of the pancreas is extremely rare in this species of rats.
 
Statistical significance is not necessary to show a connection. With the dramatic increase in pancreatic cancer, parents and the public in general should cease drinking sweetened drinks.

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Russell Blaylock, M.D., is a nationally recognized board-certified neurosurgeon, health practitioner, author, and lecturer. Dr. Blaylock writes The Blaylock Wellness Report newsletter.
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