Women with Atrial Fibrillation at More Risk Than Men

Monday, 28 Sep 2009 12:44 PM

 

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print   |
    A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
Even though the incidence of atrial fibrillation is higher in men than women, a review of past studies and medical literature completed by cardiac experts at Rush University Medical Center shows that women are more likely than men to experience symptomatic attacks, a higher frequency of recurrences, and significantly higher heart rates during atrial fibrillation, which increases the risk of stroke.

Findings from the review of past studies will be published in the September issue of Gender Medicine.

Atrial fibrillation is a cardiovascular disorder affecting 2.2 million people in the United States. During atrial fibrillation, the heart's atria, which are two small upper chambers, quiver instead of beating effectively. Blood isn't pumped completely out of the atria, so it may pool and clot. If a piece of a blood clot in the atria leaves the heart and becomes lodged in an artery in the brain, a stroke results.

In recent years, women have surpassed men in both prevalence and mortality due to cardiovascular disease.

“Stroke is one of the most devastating results of cardiovascular disease and atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke,” said cardiologist Dr. Annabelle Volgman, medical director of the Heart Center for Women at Rush University Medical Center and principal investigator of the study. “Women are at higher risk of atrial fibrillation-related stroke than men and are more likely to live with stroke-related disability which can significantly lower quality of life.”

“We reviewed past studies addressing gender differences in atrial fibrillation over a 20 year period in order to pinpoint the gender differences for women versus men with atrial fibrillation,” said Volgman.

Researchers identified the following gender differences for women versus men with atrial fibrillation:
• Women have a higher incidence of stroke and mortality than do men.

• Women are not prescribed blood thinners (anticoagulation therapy) as often as are men, which results in a higher incidence of formation of blood clots that break loose and block other vessels.

• Women have a greater risk of bleeding from anticoagulation therapy than do men.
Monitor anticoagulation therapy carefully to avoid bleeding.
• Women have a higher risk of life-threatening arrhythmias and slow heart rates requiring permanent pacing when treated with antiarrhythmic drugs..
• Women have hormonal fluctuations.

• Women have a higher risk of low potassium levels in the blood, increasing the risk of drug-related arrhythmias.

• Women have a higher sensitivity to supportive therapies such as statins and vasodilators.

• Women are referred less often or later for non-drug management such as pacemaker implantation or ablation.

• Women with atrial fibrillation have a lower quality of life.

“For women with atrial fibrillation, these gender differences should always be kept in mind to help prevent strokes and heart failure and improve their quality of life,” said Volgman.

© HealthDay

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print   |
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Find Your Condition
You May Also Like
Around the Web
Most Commented

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAXHEALTH.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
> >