Milk Fights Diabetes: Study

Wednesday, 30 Apr 2014 04:45 PM

By Nick Tate

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Got milk? If so, you may have a lower risk of developing diabetes, a new study suggests.
Danish researchers foundthat whey protein, found in milk and cheese, can lower the amount of fat in the blood after meals and increase insulin, which clears sugar in the blood, keeping glucose at healthy levels — a key goal of diabetes management.

The new study, published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Proteome Research, suggests dairy products could have health benefits for people who are obese and do not yet have diabetes and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Special: The Top 4 Signs That You’re Already Prediabetic

Lead researchers Lars O. Dragsted and Kjeld Hermansen noted that obesity is major public health problems worldwide. In the U.S., about 35 percent of adults are obese, a condition that can lead to a number of health issues, including cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes.

One risk factor in obese people high levels of fat in their blood after they eat. But recent research has found that these levels depend on the kind of protein included in the meal.

For the new study, researchers gave volunteers who were obese and non-diabetic the same meal of soup and bread plus one kind of protein, either from whey, gluten, casein (another milk protein) or cod. The scientists found that those who ate the meal supplemented with whey had lower levels of fatty acids in their blood after meals but higher amounts of the specific types of amino acids that boost insulin levels.

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