Glen Campbell Moved to Alzheimer's Care Facility

Thursday, 17 Apr 2014 03:58 PM

By Nick Tate

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Glen Campbell, who has been suffering with Alzheimer's disease for the past several years, has been moved into a residential facility that cares for individuals with dementia.

The Grammy-winning singer-guitarist, 78, first revealed that he has the brain-wasting disease in 2011, when the condition forced him to curtail his touring and musical career. At the time, Campbell publicly disclosed that he was having difficult remembering the lyrics of some of his award-winning country-pop hits.

"He was moved to an Alzhemier's facility last week," a family friend tells People magazine. "I'm not sure what the permanent plan is for him yet. We'll know more next week."

Campbell and his fourth wife, Kim Woolen, went public with the news in advance of a final farewell "Goodbye Tour" tour that was filmed for a documentary called Glen Campbell … I'll Be Me, which debuts Friday at the Nashville Film Festival.
 
The documentary follows Campbell, his wife, and their three adult children on the road together and chronicles the impact and progression of the disease.

Jimmy Webb, the legendary songwriter who penned many of Campbell's hits, including "Wichita Lineman" and "By the Time I get to Phoenix," tells Newsmax Health the family made the difficult decision out of necessity. 

"Moving Glen to the Alzheimer's treatment facility was another in a long chain of difficult and brave decisions that Kim Campbell and the family have had to make," says Webb, a close family friend of the Campbells and chairman of the Songwriters Hall of Fame. "It is a 24-hour-a-day task to take care of an Alzheimer's victim at this stage. 

"Believe me, if there were a way for me to change this lyric, I would. Glen is one of my dearest friends. We all want what will keep him safe and comfortable."

Webb explais that the first signs of Campbell's condition became evident during his performances.
 
"It just started out with him like maybe forgetting a couple of lines in a song and I'd kind of look at him and I'd think, you know, time to cut back on the red wine or something like that," he recalls.

"I think there's certain stages of the disease where, I don't know how to put this, but it's almost like cute. There's an endearing quality;, it's almost like having a child, having a very precocious child, and then it goes from there very quickly to a place where it’s no longer that, it’s something else. And it really requires constant attention."
 

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