Can This Supplement Save NFL Players (and the Rest of Us) From Alzheimer's?

Thursday, 19 Sep 2013 04:17 PM

By Sylvia Booth Hubbard

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A supplement containing concentrated aloe vera that has been shown to stop dementia may be able to save NFL players from Alzheimer's and other debilitating neurological disorders.
 
Despite hundreds of millions of dollars spent on Alzheimer's research, prescription drugs designed to delay its onset or to treat Alzheimer's disease and dementia have had disappointing results. But a concentrated form of aloe vera, the plant whose gel is most commonly used to soothe sunburn and other skin irritations, may be able to prevent the brain damage associated with dementia, and even reverse it.
 
A recent study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease showed that the supplement, which has almost no side effects, improved cognitive function in 46 percent of patients with moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's — patients so severely affected by the disease that they usually aren't considered to be included in clinical trials for testing new treatments.

ALERT:
5 Signs You’ll Get Alzheimer’s Disease
Many of the improvements seen during the 12-month study were dramatic.

"I've had caregivers in tears because this product brought people back," said lead researcher John E. Lewis, an associate professor at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. "They couldn't believe that after years of their loved ones being less than a child — being of no use to themselves or to others — they began recalling family members and having meaningful conversations."
 
Lewis' study found a 377 percent increase in stem cell production, and believes that neurons were created as a result of the supplement.

"How else can you explain an improvement in cognitive functioning?" he asks. "There have to be neurons coming back to the brain.
 
"I think this may save some NFL players, and anyone that's involved in a high-intensity activity where they may not have had an acute injury but are in a very acute stage of inflammation," said Lewis. "Inflammation is related to all kinds of chronic diseases, and we know from our studies that the aloe vera product brings down inflammation."
 
Lewis used a formulation called New Eden in his study, but says that you can get similar concentrated aloe vera products in health food stores.
 
"NFL players may be able to treat their dementia and even prevent it by taking this formula," said Lewis.
 
To read more about Lewis' Alzheimer's research, CLICK HERE.
 
Statistics indicate that 1 out of 3 former NFL players may suffer from some type of cognitive impairment caused by repeated concussions.

The inflammation caused by brain injuries can lead to many debilitating conditions including depression, chronic headaches, and dementia. A recent study by Dr. Gary Small, UCLA professor and author of The Mind Health Report, used a new scanning technique to identify tau protein tangles, a hallmark sign of Alzheimer's disease, to study five ex-NFL players. All five retired players showed signs of brain damage.
ALERT: 5 Signs You’ll Get Alzheimer’s Disease

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