Dr. Gary Small, M.D., is a professor of psychiatry and aging and director of the UCLA Longevity Center at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. Dr. Small, one the nations top brain health experts, frequently appears on The Today Show, Good Morning America, and The Dr. Oz Show. He is co-author with his wife Gigi Vorgan of many popular books, including The New York Times best-seller, The Memory Bible, and The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program. He is author of The Mind Health Report newsletter.

Dr. Gary Small, M.D.

The Power of CoQ10

Friday, 13 Jun 2014 04:26 PM

By Dr. Small

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a substance that is made by our bodies. However, its production declines naturally as we get older. In addition, statin drugs, taken for lowering cholesterol, deplete CoQ10. In Canada, the government requires that statin drug labels carry a warning about CoQ10 depletion.
 
Food is not a significant source of CoQ10. The nutrient is found in very small quantities in meat, especially organ meats, but these amounts are not sufficient to produce health benefits. Supplements are the only therapeutic source.
 
Without CoQ10, the mitochondria in cells simply can’t do their job. Studies have found that compared to healthy people, levels of CoQ10 are significantly lower in those
with chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. CoQ10 supplementation can be very helpful in relieving symptoms.
 
In one study, 300 mg of CoQ10 a day significantly reduced pain, fatigue, and morning stiffness among people with fibromyalgia. Benefits were measured after 40 days of supplementation, but clinical experience shows that improvement usually occurs gradually. Some people may notice benefits after only a few days of supplementation.
 
In addition to providing fuel for mitochondria, CoQ10 is an antioxidant, and reduces levels of harmful molecules known as free radicals. It also reduces inflammation and protects mitochondria.
 
The researchers, whose study was published in the journal Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, concluded that CoQ10 could be part of an effective therapy for fibromyalgia.
 
Other studies show that the supplement is equally important for people with CFS. For example, a study published in the journal Neuroendocrinology Letters noted that “symptoms, such as fatigue, and autonomic and neurocognitive symptoms may be caused by CoQ10 depletion.”

© 2014 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Gary Small, M.D., is a professor of psychiatry and aging, and director of the UCLA Longevity Center at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. Dr. Small, one the nation’s top brain health experts, is author of The Mind Health Report newsletter.
Around the Web
Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Find Your Condition
You May Also Like
Around the Web
Most Commented

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAXHEALTH.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
> >