Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: stamps | licking | envelope | glue | Oz | Roizen

What's in Stamp and Envelope Glue?

Monday, 13 Jan 2014 09:08 AM

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In a 1996 "Seinfeld" episode, George's fiance Susan licks so many cheap envelopes (George bought them for the wedding invitations) that she poisons herself. Makes for riotous TV, but fortunately these days, or even back then, lickin' envelopes and stamps was never such a risky business.

There was a time in the 1960s when the gum on U.S. stamps shielded bacteria and viruses, so they could survive for months. That meant you could, theoretically, pick up a bug from an envelope you received. And back then, if you were lickin' stamps for 100 wedding invitations, it wasn't a bad idea to count your calories! Glue on a postage stamp could deliver around 6-14 calories!

Most stamps and many envelopes don't take a lickin' anymore. They're self-adhesive. Among the few water-activated stamps left, no animal products are used in making the glue (they're vegan); those in Israel are certified Kosher; and in the U.S., lickable envelope glue is made from corn, so it's gluten-free! If you wonder about the safety of imported glues on greeting-card envelopes, for example, the Food and Drug Administration has increased its presence in China to enforce quality standards. And you can always use a damp sponge instead of your tongue.

But if you're looking for surprising stamp sensations with great aromas, try these: a cacao-oil infused Belgium stamp that tastes like fine chocolate, a coffee-infused Brazilian stamp, and a Swiss stamp that smells like chocolate.

© King Features Syndicate

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