Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, M.D. ischief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients. Dr. Crandall is author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter.

Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, M.D.

Say 'No' to High-Fat Foods

Wednesday, 20 Feb 2013 10:30 AM

By Chauncey Crandall, M.D.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
If you're tempted to cheat on your healthy diet and go on a binge, stop right there. New
research suggests that even a single high-fat meal can damage your heart.

Researchers from Montreal, presenting the study at the Canadian Cardiology Conference in Toronto, recently studied the effects of one meal high in saturated fat compared to a
Mediterranean-style meal of similar calories, but rich in monounsaturated “good” fats.

The researchers fed their subjects (28 nonsmoking men) a high-fat meal of a sandwich made from an egg, a sausage link, and a slice of cheese, accompanied by hash browns.

In contrast, the Mediterranean-style meal was salmon, almonds, and vegetables cooked in olive oil. The egg sandwich was 58 percent fat, compared to 51 percent fat for the salmon meal.

After each meal, the researchers gave the men ultrasound tests to evaluate how their coronary arteries were functioning. The researchers found that after the high-fat meal, the men’s coronary arteries’ ability to widen and maintain good blood flow was diminished by 24 percent.

On the other hand, after eating the Mediterranean-style meal, the men’s coronary arteries operated efficiently, and the blood flowed through their hearts normally.

The inability of the heart’s coronary arteries to function properly is a precursor of coronary
heart disease. So the next time you are tempted to binge on foods high in saturated fat, munch on some almonds instead.

© 2014 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Find Your Condition
You May Also Like
Around the Web
Most Commented

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAXHEALTH.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved