Dr. David Brownstein, M.D., is a board-certified family physician and one of the nation’s foremost practitioners of holistic medicine. He is editor of Dr. David Brownstein’s Natural Way to Health newsletter. Dr. Brownstein has lectured internationally to physicians and others about his success with natural hormones and nutritional therapies in his practice. His books include Drugs That Don’t Work and Natural Therapies That Do!; Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can’t Live Without It; Salt Your Way To Health; The Miracle of Natural Hormones; Overcoming Arthritis, Overcoming Thyroid Disorders; The Guide to a Gluten-Free Diet; and The Guide to Healthy Eating. He is the medical director of the Center for Holistic Medicine in West Bloomfield, Mich., where he lives with his wife, Allison, and their teenage daughters, Hailey and Jessica.

Dr. David Brownstein, M.D.

Spice May Stop Diabetes

Wednesday, 26 Dec 2012 08:35 AM

By Chauncey Crandall, M.D.

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Diabetes is a major risk factor for heart disease, and researchers are finding that curcumin, the main substance in the Indian spice turmeric, may help prevent it.

Studies have shown that turmeric has healthy properties, including helping to lower inflammation and oxidative stress, which can contribute to diabetes.

Researchers in Thailand recruited 240 adults with prediabetes, and divided them into two groups. They gave one group curcumin supplements to take six times a day, and the other group was given capsules filled with an inactive ingredient.

After nine months, 19 out of the 116-member control group had developed diabetes, but no one in the curcumin-taking group did.

The researchers cautioned that this was a small study, and more research needs to be done. However, turmeric is a popular spice that can easily be added to the diet. Use it in Indian curry, or use small amounts (1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon) to season soups, beans, brown rice, quinoa, or couscous.


© 2014 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.

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Chauncey W. Crandall, M.D., is chief of the cardiac transplant program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic. Dr. Crandall, who received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, is author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter.
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