Exercise Reduces Alzheimer's Risk: Cleveland Clinic

Wednesday, 02 Jul 2014 05:55 PM

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
Exercise may help boost brain power in people who have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study.
 
The findings suggest even moderate amounts of physical activity may help to slow the progression of the memory-robbing condition, The New York Times reports.
 
ALERT: These 7 Things Activate Alzheimer’s In Your Brain

The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience by researchers at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, involved almost 100 older men and women, aged 65 to 89, many of whom had a family history of Alzheimer’s disease.
 
The researchers asked the volunteers in their new experiment how often and intensely they exercised. About half didn’t exercise much at all. But the other half walked, jogged, or otherwise exercised moderately a few times every week.
 
In the end, the scientists divided their volunteers into four groups, based on their e4 status and exercise habits. One group included those people with the e4 gene who did not exercise; another consisted of those with the e4 gene who did exercise; and the other two groups were composed of those without the gene who did or did not regularly exercise.
 
Brain scans indicated those of physically active volunteers tended to resemble the brains of people at much lower risk for the disease — even when those individuals had brain features that naturally placed them at higher risk for dementia.  
 
Meanwhile, the brains of sedentary people at high risk appeared to be slipping, structurally, toward dysfunction.
 
Urgent: Assess Your Heart Attack Risk in Minutes. Click Here.

-

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Retype Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Find Your Condition
You May Also Like
Around the Web
Most Commented

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAXHEALTH.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved